Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Nagamalli Fruit - The Cannon Ball


  1. #1
    Sudhakar Redddy is offline Enthusiast
    Sudhakar Redddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009

    Location
    Hyderabad, India

    Posts
    917

    Default Nagamalli Fruit - The Cannon Ball


    Hi,

    Earlier I have posted the Cannon Ball tree & its beautiful flowers.

    But the tree derived its name from the shape & size of its fruit.

    Here is the Cannon ball:



    Here is an account of the fruit from Wiki:

    Couroupita guianensis

    "The tree gets its common name from the large, spherical fruits it produces. The fruit falls from the tree and cracks open when it hits the ground when mature, often causing the sound of a small explosion. The fruit emits an unpleasant aroma when exposed to the air. Individual seeds within the "ball" are coated with hair, which is thought to protect the seed when it is ingested and may also help in the passage of the seed through the intestines. The cannonball tree and it's fruit are thought by some to be remnants of the last ice age, like the "hedge apple" or "osage orane" of north America. The fruit is thought to be an adaptation provided for the giant ground sloth, a long extinct species. Today instead of seeds being dispersed by the large extinct mammal, the fruit simply rots around the base of it's mother tree. Like coconut palms, the trees should not be planted near paths or near traffic-filled areas, as the heavy nut is known to fall without notice".
    Sudhakar
    Nikon D 3100, D 40X.
    Nikon 18-55mm VR, 55-200mm VR, 70-300mm VR, 35mm & 18-135 mm.


  2. #2
    hunter58 is offline Dedicated Member
    hunter58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011

    Location
    Spring Hill, FL

    Posts
    2,260

    Default


    Wow! I wouldn't want that to fall on me. Really neat picture and interesting too.


  3. #3
    Sudhakar Redddy is offline Enthusiast
    Sudhakar Redddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009

    Location
    Hyderabad, India

    Posts
    917

    Default


    It indeed looks like a cannon ball.
    Sudhakar
    Nikon D 3100, D 40X.
    Nikon 18-55mm VR, 55-200mm VR, 70-300mm VR, 35mm & 18-135 mm.


  4. #4
    Skippy is offline photozoholic
    Skippy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008

    Location
    NY State

    Posts
    13,930
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default


    Wow that is interesting. But if it smells why would anyone want in their garden. It must be also vanishing if their are no transporters of seed left. Thanks for sharing.


  5. #5
    Sudhakar Redddy is offline Enthusiast
    Sudhakar Redddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009

    Location
    Hyderabad, India

    Posts
    917

    Default


    In fact, no one grows them in their back yard for fear of serpents visiting these plants, being attracted by the lovely fragrance of their flowers. Physically, the flower resembles the hood of a serpent.

    These flowers are offered to Lord Shiva in prayer & so these plants are seen in temples devoted to Lord Shiva.

    However, I never had the "good luck" of experiencing the smell of the fruit when open.

    There are about 10 plants in the park in 2 rows where I took these photos & the beautiful fragrance of these flowers spreads over the entire area.

    Yes, there may be other transporters which transport the seeds or they adopt other methods like planting the stems. Otherwise, the plant would have been extinct by now.
    Sudhakar
    Nikon D 3100, D 40X.
    Nikon 18-55mm VR, 55-200mm VR, 70-300mm VR, 35mm & 18-135 mm.


  6. #6
    Sage is offline photozoholic
    Sage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007

    Location
    Kentucky

    Posts
    6,689

    Default


    Those things look dangerous. You could be knocked unconscious if one hit you on the head. Very interesting Sudhakar. Thanks for sharing the information with us. ~~Peg
    Peg
    “There is a crack in everything.That's how the light gets in.”― Leonard Cohen


  7. #7
    Sudhakar Redddy is offline Enthusiast
    Sudhakar Redddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009

    Location
    Hyderabad, India

    Posts
    917

    Default


    Thank u Peg. The fruit does look scary enough to keep one away.
    Sudhakar
    Nikon D 3100, D 40X.
    Nikon 18-55mm VR, 55-200mm VR, 70-300mm VR, 35mm & 18-135 mm.


Posting Permissions


  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Bookmarks